Gerard Viner Middleton FRSC

13-May-1931 - 02-Nov-2021

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Posted by William & Mary Neal | 07-Dec-2021

A 14 month port-doctoral fellowship with Gerry as my mentor in the late 1970s established a life-long friendship as well as an on-going mentorship and inspiration for professional achievement. Gerry and Muriel were ideal hosts in welcoming us to Canada and helping us establish our home in Hamilton. We extend our condolences to Gerry's wife and family. Sincerely, Bill and Mary Neal

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Posted by Jim and Miriam Kramer | 13-Nov-2021

When we came to Hamilton, long ago, Gerry and Muriel went out of their way to help us feel at home at McMaster and in Ancaster. Their kindness meant a lot. With sincere sympathy.

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Posted by Glenn Fiforowich | 13-Nov-2021

My deepest sympathy to my cousin Muriel and your children Laurence, Teresa, Margaret and your grandchildren. When I first met Gerry, he loved to talk about geology and teaching at a university. Gerry also loved to barbecue and wine. We had a wonderful time and my visit was very enjoyable. May God Bless Muriel and the entire family during this difficult time. I am sure that Gerry's work was well done here and now his new work has begun in the heaven. May Gerry Rest In Peace!
Cousin Glenn John Fiforowich

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Posted by Emiliano Mutti | 10-Nov-2021

I think I learnt much from his papers and even more from his comments in the field during unforgettable trips in France, Spain and Italy Gerry was an outstanding sedimentologist and a true gentleman. My deepest condolences to the family

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Posted by Gregg Monastiero | 10-Nov-2021

Our family wants to express our sincere condolences to your family . You are all in our thoughts and prayers .
Gregg and Regina Monastiero

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Posted by Richard Hyde | 09-Nov-2021

In Dr.G.V. Middleton, we have a giant in his chosen field. I knew Gerry as a graduate student in the sedimentology program in the Dept of Geology at McMaster University in the 1970s. I felt privileged as a student to be associated with Gerry and his esteemed colleague Dr. R. G. Walker. Deepest condolences to the Middleton family.

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Posted by Janok Bhattacharya | 09-Nov-2021

I took my first sedimentology class in 1979 at Memorial University of Newfoundland with Rick Hiscott, Gerry's newly minted PhD student. Gerry's legacy in populating universities with his graduate students is legendary. Peter Martini at Guelph, Bob Dalrymple at Queen's, Rick Cheel at Brock- the list goes on. In 1984 I started my PhD studies at McMaster. Gerry was on sabbatical in France, so I busied myself taking the fluid mechanics courses in civil engineering we were re required to tackle Gerry's courses. Once he arrived back, although Roger Walker was my supervisor, he required us to take all of Gerry's offerings. Whenever possible, Gerry would always emphasis what we did not know in the science. Every lecture was like a thesis proposal, filled with idea about what to focus on next.

The Middleton-Walker team was legendary as other’s have commented.

Gerry went far beyond the classroom in his mentoring. I recall Gerry having us all over for a blind wine-tasting at his house – all Rieslings and the Canadian Pelee Island won the day. I was talking to Gerry about becoming a member of the Royal Society of Canada and he made it very clear, the best thing was having an opportunity to meet Margaret Atwood, his favourite Canadian Author. I hadn’t really heard of her, and he prompted to read The Edible Woman, and key piece of Canadian feminist literature and I have read most of her books since.

There are so many other important moments where Gerry inspired. He will be remembered by many, and his influence is still felt far and wide.

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Posted by Howard Harper | 09-Nov-2021

Very sad news as another great sedimentary geologist is lost to the community. I am glad that his colleagues at SEPM recognized him with the Twenhofel and Pettijohn Medals as well as Honorary Membership while he was still with us. Again a sad loss to the community.

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Posted by I. Peter Martini | 09-Nov-2021

My sincere condolences to Muriel and family. Gerry and Muriel hosted me at the McMaster University as an immigrant just after my first geology field experience of the summer 1962. After few months my girlfriend joined me and we were married. I remember that Muriel donated us a good used easy chair …and that started my Canadian adventure. Prof Middleton (Gerry) was really understanding of my limited English, and he guided me throughout the marvelous, for sedimentologists at least, period. A lot was there to learn, the value of the sedimentary structures, grain size, facies, statistical and experimental approaches. Prof Middleton was a gentle, great scientist with a brilliant mind. I was his first Ph.D. and I am proud of it and grateful to have been imprinted with several basic concepts that helped throughout my life and research.

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Posted by Andrew Miall | 08-Nov-2021

I was privileged to have visited McMaster University several times in the late 70s and early 80s, and to have taken part in the Middleton-Walker seminars. These were extremely important in the development of Sedimentology, as students and visitors presented their best work for free and open discussion. Gerry was a pre-eminent geologist and sedimentologist, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. He contributed greatly to the development of sedimentology in Canada. He also founded and was the first editor of Geoscience Canada, the national journal for Earth Scientists. His interests were many and varied. Charlene, my wife, and I had the opportunity to take a field trip with him on the stone houses of Niagara, which we thoroughly enjoyed. I personally will miss his enthusiasm for the subject we shared and his always pleasant and interesting discussions of the things he enjoyed. My sincere condolences to the family at this sad time.

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